Freymiller partners with Wreaths Across America for another year of honoring, teaching, and remembering

Wreaths Across America

In the world of trucking, it is rarely just about making deliveries. At Freymiller, our team goes the extra mile in their dedication to making a positive impact. One way we do this is through our partnership with Wreaths Across America, which shares our mission of giving back to the community and serving a higher purpose.

Wreaths Across America is a nonprofit organization with a profound mission – to remember, honor, and teach. Founded in 1992, this organization is dedicated to ensuring that the sacrifices made by our military heroes are never forgotten. One of its most notable annual events is the placement of handcrafted wreaths on the graves of veterans across the United States every December. Professional drivers nationwide come together to make this happen, with over 2 million wreaths being transported by truck drivers in 2022.

Last year, we were an Honor Fleet for Wreaths Across America, the official name of fleets who provided their skill, time, and passion to safely deliver the wreaths to Arlington National Cemetery and other graveyards across the nation in a timely manner. 

We are honored and proud to have been one of those trucking companies showing our support to military veterans and their families, and we are looking forward to seeing what we’ll accomplish this year with Wreaths Across America. Transporting the wreaths in perfect condition takes skill and patience, and our involvement lies in the hearts of our drivers. Thank you for taking the time to participate in such an important event and for your dedication to honoring the memory of veterans and giving back to the community. 

Freymiller is also proud of our ability to financially support and contribute to Wreaths Across America and their greater mission of educating citizens about America’s service veterans. The nonprofit strives to ensure that no one is forgotten, and we are honored to be able to further that mission. 

We are not just in the business of transportation; we’re in the business of honoring, remembering, and teaching. Join us today for a lifelong, satisfying career at a carrier committed to making a difference.

How to maintain your truck in Fall 2023

Winding two lane road in Fall

Autumn is here bringing not only some much-appreciated cooler temps, but also specific maintenance needs to keep your truck rolling smoothly. In our quick guide for truck maintenance, we’ll give you the key factors to consider for a safe and successful journey this time of year.

Check your tires

Fall means wet leaves and unpredictable weather, which makes tire maintenance a top priority. Start by inspecting your tires for tread wear and proper inflation. Make sure your tire pressure is within the recommended range, as colder temperatures can cause pressure to drop. Well-maintained tires ensure better traction and handling, especially when navigating through wet leaves and slippery roads.

Prep your windshield

In the fall, the angle of the sun is naturally lower, specifically at sunrise and sunset. This can lead to increased sun glare, reducing visibility. Dirty windshields including ones cluttered with falling leaves, make this issue worse. Before hitting the road, clean your windshield inside and out, ensuring there are no streaks or smudges. Seasoned professional drivers keep a supply of washer fluid on hand to quickly remove debris and dirt.

Prepping your windshield for fall includes assessing your wipers. Rainy conditions and falling leaves make effective wipers even more important. Check the condition of your wiper blades and replace them if they are worn or streaking.

Monitor your brakes

Ill-operating brakes are never a good thing, but in the fall, the danger only increases. Rain, and even snow, can be common during this time of the year. Wet roads and slippery leaves dramatically decrease traction and require well-maintained brakes to ensure safe stopping distances. Check your brake pads and rotors for wear and tear. If you notice any squeaking or grinding noises, it may be time to replace them.

Prepare for fog

Fall often brings foggy mornings and evenings. Ensure your fog lights are in working condition and replace any burnt-out bulbs. During pre- and post-trip inspections, make sure that your headlights are aligned correctly, as proper alignment is vital for top visibility in foggy conditions.

Watch out for wildlife

Remember that during fall, it’s mating season for deer and other wildlife. Watch for deer crossing signs and remain vigilant for wildlife, especially during dawn and dusk. Keep a safe distance, avoid sudden maneuvers, and drive cautiously to prevent collisions with animals on the road.

It’s not only time to keep your truck in tip-top shape, it’s also time to assess if you’re satisfied with your driving career. Looking for a better career home? Connect with us today to learn more about our opportunities for CDL-A drivers.

7 haunted rest areas truck drivers should know about

Foggy street illuminated by street lamps at night

One of the coolest parts about a career in truck driving is being able to travel and see beautiful sights across the country. But as the nights stretch on longer and the leaves start to rustle in the breeze, here are seven supposedly haunted stops along America’s most popular trucking routes.

1. Uniondale, Indiana: A Rest Stop’s Restless Spirit

Tucked right off I-69 in Indiana, Uniondale appears to be like any other small, quiet, Midwestern town. But its rest stop has a chilling secret behind it. Local legend has it that the ghost of a grieving mother has made the truck stop her home as she endlessly searches for her missing child. Some truck drivers have reported that they’ve heard faint cries in the dead of night.

2. Resurrection Mary: A Hitchhiker’s Ghost

Moving north to the Windy City, Chicago, several truck drivers shared stories of a ghost named Resurrection Mary. This ghost takes on the appearance of a hitchhiker and is most frequently spotted along Archer Avenue. Mary attempts to lure drivers into stopping and giving her a ride… destination unknown. Witnesses have described her as a young woman in a white dress, but as they approach the nearby aptly named Resurrection Cemetery, she vanishes.

3. Vicksburg, Mississippi: McRaven Mansion

While not a truck stop today, the McRaven Mansion in Vicksburg deserves to be mentioned. Originally built in 1797, it served as a rest stop along the Natchez Trace for pioneers en route to Nashville. The mansion sits close to I-20 and is rumored to be one of the most haunted houses in the South. Truck drivers who have stopped to check it out have reported seeing shadowy figures dart through the halls and eerie whispers come from empty rooms.

4. Highway 666: The Devil’s Highway

Now known as US-491, this stretch of road was once known as Highway 666. Located in the Four Corners region, a long history of infamy follows this highway. Many truckers believed it had been cursed due to an unusually high number of accidents and paranormal occurrences. Some have claimed to see unexplainable apparitions and otherwise strange phenomena while driving along this eerie route.

5. Jerome, Arizona: The Ghost Town on a Hill

Jerome is an old mining town that clings to the side of a steep and treacherous hillside in Arizona. It is well known for its turbulent history, with many believing the ghosts of past minors and misfits still inhabit the town. Truck drivers just passing through on their way to other locations have witnessed strange noises, and mysterious shadows, and some have even claimed to see ghostly miners wandering the empty streets. It’s a town forever frozen in the past.

6. Guthrie, Oklahoma: Stone Lion Inn

If you’re ever in need of a place to stop, maybe take the Stone Lion Inn off your list. It has a reputation for being one of the most haunted locations in all of Oklahoma. This historic bed and breakfast, situated right alongside several popular trucking routes, is home to many resident spirits. Miss Mattie is one of many who roam the halls and is said to have met her demise at the inn. Apparitions, flickering lights, unexplained footsteps, and haunting whispers all come free with a stay at the Stone Lion.

7. Emporia, Kansas: Red Rocks Roadside Park

Situated along I-35 in Kansas, this is a popular resting stop for truck drivers traveling through the area. While it may seem like an ordinary rest area during the day, it takes on a whole new, darker ambiance at night. Legend has it that the place is haunted by a girl named Molly, who was killed in an accident near the rest area. Truck drivers have reported seeing the ghostly figure of a girl appear around the rest area and have also heard faint laughter.

While these stories are sure to give you goosebumps, they’re all part of the rich tapestry of American folklore and legend. Whether you’re dealing with restless spirits or just heavy traffic, stay safe out there!

How to stay safe on the road in Fall 2023

Semi truck driving at sunset

Autumn is just around the corner! And while fall comes with some much-needed cooler temps, it also brings along reduced daylight hours and other driving hazards. In this comprehensive guide for driving during the fall, we’ll give you the key factors to consider for a safe and successful fall journey.

Reduced daylight hours

Shorter days are one of the first indicators that fall is coming. For professional drivers, this may mean more time traveling without sunlight. Unless your routes specifically calls for night driving, consider planning ahead and starting your day earlier so that you can end your day before dark. As the sun sinks below the horizon, some people struggle to stay awake, making it important to have planned stops along your route if you need to pull over for a break.

Sun glare

Despite autumn giving us fewer daylight hours, it does pose a higher risk of sun glare. Due to the tilt of the Earth, the sun is closer to the horizon during the fall. The lower angle of sunlight creates a more intense glare on windshields and makes it difficult to see the road ahead. Be especially aware of this during sunset when the sun’s angle gets even lower.

Dirty windshields can make this problem worse. A pro tip is to be especially mindful of keeping your windshield free of dirt and debris during the fall. And, if you find you’re really struggling with sun glare, a pair of polarized sunglasses can go a long way in helping!

Fog

While foggy weather can occur at any time during the year, it ticks up during the fall months. Driving in fog means driving with reduced visibility. Make sure you slow down and allow for extra room between you and the vehicle in front of you. Always use low-beam headlights or fog lights if your truck comes equipped with them; never use your high-beam lights as they worsen the glare from the fog. If conditions become too dangerous, enable your hazards, and pull over in a safe location until the fog lifts.

Wet leaves

Any road debris can cause serious risks for truck drivers. As leaves fall and the frequency of rainy weather increases, a picturesque scene of orange leaves and drizzling weather can take a wrong turn. Wet leaves stick to the pavement, reducing your tires’ ability to gain traction. They can also conceal potholes, bumps, and other hazards that can cause hydroplaning.

It’s best to avoid driving through leaf patches or piles to reduce the risk of an accident. If you’re unable to avoid driving through leaves, don’t brake or swerve abruptly; this can cause your tires to slide uncontrollably.

Increased travel

One of the greatest things about fall is that it ushers in the holidays! But it also spurs increased travel patterns. In 2021, AAA estimated that 48.3 million people would be traveling on roadways during Thanksgiving and it’s expected to be around that again in 2023 This inflated number of people on U.S. highways leads to increased traffic flow and can increase the risk of accidents. Engaging in defensive driving practices can help ensure your safety in precarious situations.

Along with a higher number of commercial vehicles on the road, there’s an increased number of trucks. The fall season has a huge impact on the trucking industry as demands for shipping increase by the millions. This comes with an influx of new CDL-A drivers. Stay aware of drivers who may be getting their footing behind the wheel and remember: Everyone has to start somewhere!

Wildlife

And people won’t be the only ones traveling on and alongside roadways. Autumn is mating season for deer, meaning that their activity increases and they pose a serious risk to drivers, especially during dusk or dawn.

Be on the lookout for deer eyeshine caused by your headlights sweeping across them. It’s also important to stay aware of road signs that signify deer crossings. If you encounter a deer, avoid swerving, as it can cause your truck to jackknife or even roll over. If you drive slower and stay “animal aware” where wildlife may be more active, you’ll be better prepared to deal with any four-legged traffic!

It’s not only time to gear up for fall driving but for a sustainable, lifelong, rewarding driving career. Connect with us today to learn more about our opportunities for CDL-A drivers.

How to stay safe on the road in Fall 2023

Two Lane Road in Autumn

Autumn is just around the corner! And while fall comes with some much-needed cooler temps, it also brings along reduced daylight hours and other driving hazards. In this comprehensive guide for driving during the fall, we’ll give you the key factors to consider for a safe and successful fall journey.

Reduced daylight hours

Shorter days are one of the first indicators that fall is coming. For professional drivers, this may mean more time traveling without sunlight. Consider planning ahead and starting your day earlier so that you can avoid too much nighttime driving. As the sun sinks below the horizon, some people struggle to stay awake, making it important to have planned stops along your route if you need to pull over for a break.

Sun glare

Despite autumn giving us fewer daylight hours, it does pose a higher risk of sun glare. Due to the tilt of the Earth, the sun is closer to the horizon during the fall. The lower angle of sunlight creates a more intense glare on windshields and makes it difficult to see the road ahead. Be especially aware of this during sunset when the sun’s angle gets even lower.

Dirty windshields can make this problem worse. A pro tip is to be especially mindful of keeping your windshield free of dirt and debris during the fall. And, if you find you’re really struggling with sun glare, a pair of polarized sunglasses can go a long way in helping!

Fog

While foggy weather can occur at any time during the year, it ticks up during the fall months. Driving in fog means driving with reduced visibility. Make sure you slow down and allow for extra room between you and the vehicle in front of you. Always use low-beam headlights or fog lights if your truck comes equipped with them; never use your high-beam lights as they worsen the glare from the fog. If conditions become too dangerous, enable your hazards, and pull over in a safe location until the fog lifts.

Wet leaves

Any road debris can cause serious risks for truck drivers. As leaves fall and the frequency of rainy weather increases, a picturesque scene of orange leaves and drizzling weather can take a wrong turn. Wet leaves stick to the pavement, reducing your tires’ ability to gain traction. They can also conceal potholes, bumps, and other hazards that can cause hydroplaning.

It’s best to avoid driving through leaf patches or piles to reduce the risk of an accident. If you’re unable to avoid driving through leaves, don’t brake or swerve abruptly; this can cause your tires to slide uncontrollably.

Increased travel

One of the greatest things about fall is that it ushers in the holidays! But it also spurs increased travel patterns. In 2021, AAA estimated that 48.3 million people would be traveling on roadways during Thanksgiving. This inflated number of people on U.S. highways leads to increased traffic flow and can increase the risk of accidents. Engaging in defensive driving practices can help ensure your safety in precarious situations.

Along with a higher number of commercial vehicles on the road, there’s an increased number of trucks. The fall season has a huge impact on the trucking industry as demands for shipping increase by the millions. This comes with an influx of new CDL-A drivers. Stay aware of drivers who may be getting their footing behind the wheel and remember: Everyone has to start somewhere!

Wildlife

And people won’t be the only ones traveling on and alongside roadways. Autumn is mating season for deer, meaning that their activity increases and they pose a serious risk to drivers, especially during dusk or dawn.

Be on the lookout for deer eyeshine caused by your headlights sweeping across them. It’s also important to stay aware of road signs that signify deer crossings. If you encounter a deer, avoid swerving, as it can cause your truck to jackknife or even roll over. If you drive slower and stay “animal aware” where wildlife may be more active, you’ll be better prepared to deal with any four-legged traffic!

It’s not only time to gear up for fall driving but for a sustainable, lifelong, rewarding driving career. Connect with us today to learn more about our opportunities for CDL-A drivers.

Combating human trafficking in the truck driving industry

Close Up of a police badge

As part of our commitment to safe and ethical practices within the trucking industry, Freymiller is proud to support law enforcement agencies in their efforts to combat human trafficking and prostitution. Recently, the Oklahoma City Police Department’s Vice Unit completed a successful two-day joint operation targeting individuals involved in prostitution. Here’s an overview of the significance of this operation, its outcomes, and Freymiller’s involvement in the fight against human trafficking.

The Vice Unit worked in collaboration with the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics Human Trafficking Unit and the United States Marshals Service. The operation resulted in 34 arrests, the recovery of two firearms, and a small amount of narcotics seized. Additionally, 30 vehicles were towed with holds placed on them for nuisance abatement.

On July 1, 2023, House Bill 2054 was passed, which classified the solicitation of individuals for sexual activity in exchange for money as a felony. This strengthened the enforcement of anti-prostitution laws. By supporting these legislative efforts, the truck driving community can play an essential role in preventing human trafficking from taking place along the roads and highways and at truck stops.

In another recently completed operation, Vice Unit offices collaborated with Freymiller to target truck stop prostitution at Reno and Martin Luther King Blvd. This one-day operation led to the arrest of seven individuals involved in illegal activities. We stand with law enforcement in fighting against prostitution and human trafficking and are proud to support these efforts.

As truck drivers, you play a crucial role in supporting the safety of our roadways. Freymiller urges all our drivers to remain vigilant and report suspicious activities. Remember, trafficking victims may be found at truck stops, rest areas, or other sites along your routes. Being aware of the signs of trafficking can make a significant difference in identifying and rescuing victims. Stay informed, stay engaged, and together, let’s make our highways safer for everyone.

Connect with Freymiller today to learn more about our truck driving opportunities today.

The Evolution of Freymiller: A Journey of Growth and Innovation

Illustration of an idea being formed

Freymiller Trucking has been a leader in the transportation industry for over five decades. During that time, we’ve seen tremendous growth and evolution from our humble beginnings as a small business to one of the largest trucking companies in the United States. Here is a quick overview of the last 50 years at Freymiller.

1968

This is the year Don Freymiller, our founder, bought his first truck. He grew up on a Wisconsin dairy farm, and with a young family of his own in 1986, he wanted an opportunity to better provide for them.

1980

After 12 years of hard work, determination, and dedication, Don had grown substantially from that one truck. He established Freymiller Trucking, which boasted a 56-truck fleet. And, he had found a specialty: hauling temperature-controlled freight. Don created the strong family atmosphere that would persist for generations at Freymiller, where we know everyone by name and uphold our longstanding company-wide policy of treating others as we would like to be treated. 

Present day

Over 50 years since its beginning, Freymiller is still family owned and operated, with a second generation joining our mission of always going the extra mile for every customer. Headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oka., Freymiller stands out from the rest because of you: Our dedicated team of employees, drivers, and contractors who work hard to provide our customers with exceptional service and safety on every load. Now, every customer, driver, and employee is backed by the strength of a half-century of experience and our solid, reliable financial position.

Our goal is always to provide top-notch service, supported by a team of professionals who cultivate an environment invested in innovative thinking and problem-solving. Our team is full of highly qualified and motivated members devoted to operating safe and well-maintained equipment and technology that improves productivity and safety. This commitment to a Safety-First culture has gotten us far, and we were honored to be named Oklahoma’s Safest Fleet in 2023.

Our future

In 1968, Freymiller’s core values began to take shape with the purchase of that first truck. Safety, professionalism, integrity, and excellence have driven us for over 50 years and allowed us to become North America’s leading trucking company, providing customers with the most reliable temperature-controlled equipment and time-sensitive service. But what drives us more than anything? Quality, and doing what’s right. We’re proud of the long-term relationships we’ve created with our customers, team members, and vendors and look forward to the future at Freymiller.

Come be part of the 50 years of professionalism, integrity, and excellence. Learn more about our driving opportunities today.

Behind the Wheel: Stories from the Road – Unveiling the Adventures of Our Truckers

Double Yellow Line on the road

Truck driving is more than a profession, it’s a way of life. Professional drivers are an essential part of the American economy and keep the supply chain moving. But aside from their critical role in society, truckers also live a unique lifestyle filled with adventures and challenges. We asked some CDL-A drivers to share their most memorable stories from the road, showcasing the excitement of trucking.

This driver got a once-in-a-lifetime view of a satellite!

“First time I saw a Starlink satellite overnight right after they launched. Thought I was witnessing a real-life non-terrestrial spacecraft, I remember repeatedly smashing the dashcam button, but the angle was too high to catch it. Was between Champaign, Ill., and Kankakee, Ill.”

Some unexpected horsin’ around…

 “I was on the New Jersey turnpike at about 3 am with a load of pork coming out of PA. I’m just driving along, singing along to the radio, when I notice a shadow way up in high beams. I start slowing down and try to figure out what this thing is. I thought maybe it was a deer or something. No, it wasn’t a deer; it was a horse. There was a horse trotting down the interstate.”

This driver relearned the meaning of early bird gets the worm.

“After running hard for a couple of days, I pulled onto a get-on ramp on I-70 in Kansas for a short power nap about one hour before sunset. I got into the sleeper and left the curtain open a little. Just as the sun was on the horizon, I woke up thinking I’d slept all night, and this was sunrise, and I was late! I jumped into the driver’s seat barefooted… it took a few miles for me to compute, I was heading westbound into a SETTING SUN, and I hadn’t slept all night.”

Getting on the wrong side of the tracks…

“I was making a delivery and was crossing the train tracks in a strange town. Along the tracks were those cone-shaped pine trees used as windbreakers or privacy walls. I couldn’t see through them at all because they were so thick. Slowly, I crossed the tracks. There were no red lights flashing, the oncoming traffic was blasting through there, and I had no reason to believe it wasn’t safe to cross. Needless to say, I began crossing the tracks. Immediately past the trees, I looked left and saw a train, with its light on, coming at me from about 40 yards away! I could feel the engine thumping. I gunned it! In an automatic, this means you go nowhere fast. Fortunately for me, I made it. Barely! I looked back over my shoulder and saw that it was a stupid rail yard, and they were doing a turnaround and had parked that train there out of the way. It sucked. Big time!”

Truck drivers are essential to our nation, and it’s important to recognize and share their incredible stories. At Freymiller, we reward that hard work and dedication. Learn more about our driving opportunities today.

Keeping CDL-A drivers up to date with the latest tech

Circuit board graphic

The trucking industry has been around for decades but has experienced significant changes with time. As technology continues to advance, the trucking industry welcomes new possibilities for improving the safety, efficiency, and comfort of truck drivers on the road. Here’s a look at the latest tech and how it aids in making CDL-A drivers’ lives easier while on the road.

Automatic transmissions

In 2023, technology like enhanced power steering and advanced braking systems are standard. However, it may come as a surprise to hear that more and more trucks are being outfitted with automatic transmissions. This tech eases the stress of managing a truck’s shifting, especially in critical situations. Automatic transmissions make a driver’s time on the road even safer by reducing the need to manually shift and allowing for more focus on the road, decreasing driver fatigue, improving defensive driving techniques, and enhancing the vehicle’s performance.

Collision tech

Keeping CDL-A drivers safe is a priority in the truck driving industry. So, it really comes as no surprise that safety tech has drastically improved over the years. Collision mitigation technology uses radar, video, and sensors to monitor real-time road conditions, including lane departure and more. If a potential collision is detected, drivers are automatically alerted and can make the necessary adjustments.

Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs)

While the transition to this tech was an involved one, it simplified the lives of drivers in several ways. ELDs create less paperwork and reduce the overall reporting time for drivers. They also take away some of the stress of staying FMCSA compliant and add driving time to your day since paper logs require you to round up driving time by 15-minute increments; ELDs allow drivers to record their hours of service (HOS) to the nearest minute.

Trucking apps

Nearly everyone has access to a smartphone or tablet and understands the convenience they can offer. For professional drivers, this convenience extends even further. Apps like The Weather Channel give drivers insight into driving conditions specific to their exact location at the exact moment, reducing stress and making their time on the road even smoother. Additionally, apps like Pilot Flying J give drivers access to shower reservations, special discounts, and more.

Driver comfort tech

As technology has become more and more advanced, there have been great strides in tech that make drivers’ lives more convenient and comfortable. Devices like Wi-Fi boosters, Bluetooth capabilities, and improved communication systems have helped keep drivers connected and aware. Other technologies like seats that reduce pressure points, ambient LED lights, and cab heaters/parked HVAC systems have made drivers’ time on the road more comfortable.

Explore driving careers with the convenience and comfort of Freymiller and make the most out of your time on the road!

The 6 best on-the-go snacks for CDL-A drivers this summer

Tupperware with meals and snacks

It can be tough being on the road and wanting something to munch on that will quiet your rumbling tummy but also be easy to grab and healthy, too. We’ve done research on the most efficient, nutritious, and tasty snacks for CDL-A drivers this summer. Here are the top six snacks to keep in your cab.

Fresh fruit/vegetables

Summer is prime time for most fresh produce, making it the perfect time to grab it for an easy, on-the-go snack. Bananas, oranges, apples, peaches, cherry tomatoes, and cucumbers are readily available at most grocery stores, leave little to no mess, and help you get nutrients essential to a balanced diet.

Jerky

While incorporating fresh produce into your diet is important, getting healthy sources of protein is just as essential. The best way to include more protein in your diet while also being totally snackable? Jerky!. It usually comes prepackaged in a resealable bag, and you don’t have to worry about a quickly approaching expiration date. You’re sure to find a flavor that suits your palate from beef to turkey, elk, and even buffalo.

Tuna packs

If you try to avoid more traditional forms of meat, tuna is an alternative way to increase your diet’s protein and even provide essential omega-three fatty acids. Tuna pouches simplify the eating process and make it a great snack option. These don’t require refrigeration and stay fresh for a while like jerky. Enjoy a lemon pepper, ranch, honey BBQ, or Thai Chili style flavor pouch, and expect to feel fulfilled until your next meal!

Mixed nuts

If we were ranking these, mixed nuts just might go at the top of our list. Easy to snack on, healthy, and available at most gas stations/grocery stores, these are ideal for snacking. Some mixed nuts packages even come with dried cranberries, raisins, and chocolate to balance out the flavor palate. If you prefer a more intense flavoring, some packages are seasoned to taste like buffalo sauce, ranch, or honey mustard.

Granola bars

Like mixed nuts, this food was basically made for snacking. They come prepackaged in groups of two to solve any troubles of portion control and are an easy way to get your daily serving of oats, which are packed full of heart-healthy vitamins and aid in regulating your central nervous system.

Popcorn

While we know this one can skew to the unhealthy side if you’re not careful, there are a lot of great options for popcorn as an on-the-road snack! You can buy it pre-popped, flavored anything from white cheddar to kettle corn and save the effort of popping it yourself. But, if you’re really craving a warm snack, a freshly popped bag of popcorn is the way to go! To make it healthier, skip the butter and top it with some flavoring powder.

The next step in fueling up for a good summer? Partnering with a carrier that cares about your success! Connect with us today to learn more about our driving opportunities.